Did you notice where the author of this sign places children in relation to dogs and other animals?

12 things you should know to avoid being brainwashed (Part 7)


7

You may have already learned about the drivers for brainwashing from the introduction to this series, Exit Minders, Silence equates to Agreement (not), Losing Friends, Lack of Substance in previous posts… – this post continues with the seventh of the 12 things you should know and what you can do to avoid being brainwashed.


By joining together a number of unrelated topics from time to time (in the stories), they can create what are called complex equivalences. An example might be… “He was late for the start of our meeting today. He has no respect for yours or my time.” or “…you wouldn’t be here if you didn’t need to know this stuff”.

Highlighting the Language

Complex Equivalence

{the fact that} he was late for start of our meeting today means he has no respect for our time.

A Complex Equivalence is where two or more unrelated or partially related items are joined into a sentence. If this is done eloquently or forcefully, they may go unnoticed. You can re-read this statement (he was late for start of our meeting today) and also wonder if the person had a car problem, public transport failure, any number of situations that were unavoidable, or they just were slack and had no respect for other people’s time. Many possibilities – and without further information, we could not make a call.

The speaker has made the call though, and the speaker could continue and ask the culprit if he was late for his first date or first day on a new job? If he says ‘no’, then declare and be prepared to argue that we – this meeting and everyone in it is less important than his first day on a new job or his first date.

For the person who came in late to argue at this point requires the same person to also be prepared to delay the whole meeting to make a seemingly trivial point, denying that he/she has not considered that everyone was less important, or that these two items (their lateness and the meeting’s importance) cannot be compared, or explain their personal circumstances or whatever their point might be – either way, it is a further delay.

The shrewd speaker can stitch you up with their words any way they want. To delay the meeting further is to attract trouble for the person making the delay and can even cause an outcry from fellow attendees.

The speaker is in control and can name the behaviour in any situation to suit their point – their point in this case is to bring compliance from the audience and to eliminate resistance or discussion in general so that the audience lowers its resistance and demonstrates a level of agreement.

An Implied Complex Equivalence

{the fact that} you are here means you do need to know this stuff…

This statement as it stands is not too problematic by itself, but it is not entirely true. So moving on, if it is added to its follow-on part of the sentence:

and you do need to know this stuff! You also know that you will never have success just sitting where you are now, you need to sign up right now, to our next training which includes our 7 point plan to create success in your life.

The first part of the statements can be Ok, but all too often the next part is either not true or has only one choice and it should be challenged.

Now being able to relate anything to anything, the speaker can quickly weave this concept into their brainwashing. So, to take the above example, they then start talking about the qualities of those who do succeed in very general terms, and linking it to a behaviour that they want for the next part of the ‘show’ or the sales portion of the engagement with you.

So for instance, the value of being a person of integrity, coupled with a strong reference to being committed and not wasting each others time, they get you into a position where you cannot disagree, because it makes sense. By virtue of not putting up your hand or speaking up, you agree to all the things that they now add to being committed and a person of integrity.

So, now the attendee may be unaware, and they have been led to being ‘committed’ and a person of ‘integrity’, and that the behaviours of coming on time, only going on breaks when you are allowed, following all instructions to the ‘t’, not taking notes or ensuring you do take notes (whatever suits the current outcome), being honest and sharing your failings, being vulnerable and co-operative, doing the full training or whatever you have been roped into until it is completed (satisfying their financial target for each person).

Potential keywords here are committed, integrity, passion, open, participative, engaged, authentic, etc. and they all set the stage for the attendee going further and further into the realms of the trainer’s and devotee’s world, and getting entwined in the actions that are as much about being passionate and engaged as being open to their ‘products’ and wanting to fulfill their financial outcomes.

Notice if you can how the speaker emphasises the keywords they want to have you associate with. They might say the word slower, with expression, standing a particular way every time they say this word and other related words.


What you can do

Woven into this whole process is what in NLP we call anchoring, and it may be used together with the complex equivalence or two and other linguistic tools to modify your beliefs enough to get your commitment. In this case, I have described in loose terms the verbal way anchoring might happen, but it will no doubt be accompanied by some physical anchoring as well, many factors to make this very successful. So they anchor what is a good attribute, and they may even anchor a bad attribute a different way. Then they will utilise the good anchor to encourage you to move towards having, being or doing the good one, or move away from doing, being or having the negative anchor.

Unless you are trained in recognising these techniques, hand-998958
most will go along with this, thinking it all makes sense. When they are backed by stories too, the audience may be getting caught up with the fabricated or loosely real stories, often with so much detail, that you have lost track of time and purpose. The speakers are so skilled at dragging out a story for their purpose.

Rest assured, although they probably do like the sound of their own voice and spinning a long story, they are consuming your time that you will never get back. But know this – they always have a purpose for that story that has been carefully crafted to create a consistent response from as many people as possible who hear it.

About Control

If the speaker is in control, they will (as stated before), describe a story and then add their own interpretation, and then they may name the key behaviour in the story to suit their point, and attempt to influence your thought/response on the topic.

Other ways of control or influence is through questioning. Remember, questioning normally gives the one asking the questions the power. They get the upper hand – to be in charge of the conversation. When they ask a question, there is strong social pressure for the person to answer the question. With an audience or an intensity from another source, the pressure can be worse. As long as they keep asking questions, they have a better chance of being in charge of the conversation. This can happen even with some people that you may think never lose control of a conversation.

Excerpt from when Donald Trump was talking to MSNBC’s women for trumpChris Matthews for a pre-taped town hall in Wisconsin during March 2016:


Matthews pressed again: "Do you believe in abortion or 'no' as a principle?"
"The answer is there has to be some form of punishment," Trump said.
"For the woman?" Matthews said.
Trump said, "Yes," and nodded. Matthews pressed further: 10 days or 10 years?....


I would have to say that the one asking the questions had control just at that point was Chris Matthews, not Donald Trump. You can see that the control of the conversation moved back and forth to whoever was asking the questions.

This video clip although short does show the lead up to the infamous quotes. You may also notice the pace.

Once the question has been asked, you have control

In the video above, there is so little time between responses. The pressure for both is high.
The lesson for ourselves are – Once the question has been asked, you briefly have control. Take a deep breath and rather than attempt to answer the question under pressure, pause for your own thoughts and processing of your considered response.

The speaker may exhibit impatience quickly – and attempt to hurry you up (control) – being hurried is a way that they try to use in the hope that it will stop or short-circuit your thought process. Ignore the tactic and give your answer at your own pace. You may have noticed in the exchange with Trump and the Interviewer, they were both clutching at thoughts and quickly getting into areas that they probably did not want to go.

Giving yourself time for your own thoughts to develop can help give the impression that you are a measured person, and also improve the credibility of your answer. If you do delay too long, your answer had better be good.

Patterns

If you step back on all that is going on, you can see the pattern. It is hard to capture sometimes, because in many cases, you cannot take notes or record the session; you have to track it on the fly.

If you do notice the stories, know too that the punchline or the ‘moral’ of the story will be delivered, and that is the part you may chose to resist if it doesn’t suit your values. They usually assign meaning to the stories before you have time to assess the sentences.

Did you notice where the author of this sign places children in relation to dogs and other animals?
Did you notice where the author of this sign places children in relation to dogs and other animals?

Critical Thinking… You need to have all your senses active, thinking through and assessing what is being said to you.

Challenge all complex equivalences

So for instance, all complex equivalences should be challenged.

As an example, in the previous post:

Your presence infers you want to be told what to do

{the fact that} you came here means {you wanted} to be told what you need to hear and to act on it

Challenge might be:

The fact that I came here can mean a lot of things, but what it does mean to me is that I wanted to be presented with some information and to consider that information in my own time

Your silence infers you are resisting

there is no one else but me telling you, so this is it means {because I haven’t seen you overtly agreeing with me} you’re resisting it

Challenge might be:

Agreed, there is no one else but you telling me at this point in time, and this means I’m considering it right now, and if I can recall it properly, I may not have an opinion until next week – or ever if I don’t think it is worth it

Practice yourself

If you are involved with any training done by an experienced seller of that training, they will have practiced quite a lot to get to the place where they can confuse, redirect and get outcomes they want from attendees.

What else can you do?

You can at least practice how to respond to these situations.

– Watch debates, interviews and any other material you can and practice the ‘challenge‘ back to the speaker/trainer that works for you, just by thinking through the challenges you may come up with. You may notice that some interviewing techniques used by journalists with politicians ask fairly black and white questions to get the politician to take a side and/or draw out the extremes on one or more sides of a disagreement.

This can be interesting as the one being interviewed and watching as the objective might be a well thought out compromise or 3rd or 4th position.

Like the Trump example earlier, it pays to be practiced in your responses. I would assume that Mr Trump likes his own opinion and often answers with the first thing that comes to his mind and states it with conviction. The abortion response was one of the few statements he sought to adjust later but it happened because he was pressed for it.

– Participate in discussions and debates, interviews and any other sessions where you can practice the ‘challenge‘ back to the speaker/trainer that works for you, just by thinking through the challenges you may encounter.

Article Posts: Introduction Parts: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Conclusion References

12 things you should know to avoid being brainwashed (Introduction) - Introduction - where people overspend, waste their life and get hurt, looking out for others to guard against being brainwashed, includes signs and tips for what you can do
12 things you should know to avoid being brainwashed (References) - Brainwashing Reference Material, transcriptions of LGAT events, what's banned in some countries, about de-programmers, Cult watch, Cult truth, abusive churches, recovery programs, stories in full from Cult Awareness and Information Centre (CAIC), TED, Cults, Sects, and New Religious Movements, Resources for Recovery from Destructive Cults and Groups
12 things you should know to avoid being brainwashed (Part 1) - Awareness - Read. Be aware of what you are planning to attend, research the organisation. What you can do if you are being asked to go to an event, considering an event or someone who is wanting to sell to you.
12 things you should know to avoid being brainwashed (Part 2) - Specifics - What happened at the event you went to? Few people can describe what they have learned - "you have to be there, I can't explain..." Research states: nonspecific effects of expectancy and response sets may account for positive outcomes
12 things you should know to avoid being brain-washed (Part 3) - Loyalty and allegiances; Projecting the Perfect Leader; Long Sessions, but is there any substance?
12 things you should know to avoid being brain-washed (Part 4) - Lose your friends - Many attendees lose their own friends and family through the pressure to supply 'friends' as potential purchasers of the training or event, or to become followers of the cause.
12 things you should know to avoid being brainwashed (Part 5) - Exit Minders; Silence equates to Agreement (not); Am I the only one who is thinking this?
12 things you should know to avoid being brainwashed (Part 6) - 6 You may have already learned about the Exit Minders, Silence equates to Agreement (not), Losing Friends, Lack of Substance in previous posts… this post continues with the sixth of the 12 things you should know and what you can …
Did you notice where the author of this sign places children in relation to dogs and other animals? 12 things you should know to avoid being brainwashed (Part 7) - 7 You may have already learned about the drivers for brainwashing from the introduction to this series, Exit Minders, Silence equates to Agreement (not), Losing Friends, Lack of Substance in previous posts… – this post continues with the seventh of …

Coming Soon

12 things you should know to avoid being brainwashed (Part 8) - 8 You may have already learned about the control of media, the drivers for brainwashing and the way that people get ripped off from the introduction to this series – this post continues with the 8th of the 12 things …

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