How much can an extra hour’s sleep change you?

What they discovered is that when the volunteers cut back from seven-and-a-half to six-and-a-half hours’ sleep a night, genes that are associated with processes like inflammation, immune response and response to stress became more active. The team also saw increases in the activity of genes associated with diabetes and risk of cancer. The reverse happened when the volunteers added an hour of sleep. Continue reading How much can an extra hour’s sleep change you?

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The Brain Science Behind Gut Decisions

…carries the information from the intestines, heart, muscles and bones upward from the spinal cord. As it comes up, part of it goes to the deepest part of the brain called the brainstem, which influences our heart rate and respiration.
Also a twig of it will go over to an area called the hypothalamus, where it will govern what to do with our endocrine system, and influence your hormonal environment…. Continue reading The Brain Science Behind Gut Decisions

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Why Your Brain Needs Water

Why Your Brain Needs Water Years of research have found that when we’re parched, we have more difficulty keeping our attention focused. Dehydration can impair short-term memory function and the recall of long-term memory. The ability to perform mental arithmetic, like calculating whether or not you’ll be late for work if you hit snooze for another 15 minutes, is compromised when your fluids are low. To put the water requirements in perspective: The average adult brain is 1.3 to 1.4kg and is approx 2% (obviously varies) of the overall weight of the adult human. The brain is 70-80% water and … Continue reading Why Your Brain Needs Water

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Walking to protect your memory

It is great to use NLP and other tools to expand your choices in life, make better use of your mind and body, develop yourself and improve, but we must not neglect our mind and body from an holistic point of view. This article Walk Much? It May Protect Your Memory Down the Road suggests that walking at least six miles (nearly 10k) per week may protect brain size and in turn, preserve memory in old age, according to a study published in the October 13, 2010, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. … Continue reading Walking to protect your memory

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How could the theatre of the mind be generated by the machinery of the brain?

What Hallucination Reveals about Our Minds Added by Sonya Yeh Spencer, ITANLP Trainer, Educator & Coach Did you know that about 10 percent of the hearing impaired people get musical hallucinations and about 10 percent of the visually impaired people get visual hallucinations? How do we do it? In this facinating video, you will learn a little bit more about how our brain works. Dr. Oliver Sacks shares with you some interesting insights. Continue reading How could the theatre of the mind be generated by the machinery of the brain?

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Podcast: Michael Arbib on Mirror Neurons

Added by Mark Spencer, ITANLP Trainer, Educator and Coach A mirror neuron is a neuron that fires both when an animal or human acts and also when the human or animal observes the same action performed by another. From an NLP perspective, we would say that the functions of Mirroring were discovered 20 years earlier by Grinder and Bandler during the earliest days of the creation of NLP and it took some years for the Scientific community and the associated instruments (such as fMRI) to prove or rediscover them. Brain Science Podcast #39: Michael Arbib on Mirror Neurons Originally Posted … Continue reading Podcast: Michael Arbib on Mirror Neurons

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Podcast: Making a Decision? Take Your Time

A recent study shows that when faced with a decision, it’s best to take some time–relax and cool off–so logical thinking can guide us to the best choice. Christie Nicholson reports (Scientific American) Play the Podcast here: sa_p_podcast_100417 or from Scientific American’s Website (Note that this broadcast uses stereo features and for part of the time, sound only comes from one channel) Brain imaging studies show that low offers activate the anterior insula, an area associated with feelings of disgust or anger. So the authors note that the delay allows us to chill out and accept the most logical and … Continue reading Podcast: Making a Decision? Take Your Time

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Podcast: Neuroscience Is Everywhere

From literature to architecture, academics and entrepreneurs are using neuroscience to explain everything from why we like a complex narrative thread to why round tables are more social. Christie Nicholson reports (Scientific American) Play the Podcast here: sa_p_podcast_100403 or from Scientific American’s website …all sorts of industries are jumping to use any new brain information to support their work. Neuromarketing claims to get objective truth about peoples’ preferences by decoding the “reactions” of our neurons. Companies like No Lie fMRI, Inc., are capitalizing on the potential for tools that can “read the brain” to replace the polygraph in lie detection. … Continue reading Podcast: Neuroscience Is Everywhere

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Podcast: Manipulating Moral Judgment

Scientists find that when the area of the brain responsible for understanding the intent of others is disrupted, moral judgment is also affected. Christie Nicholson reports (Scientific American) Play the Podcast here: sa_p_podcast_100329 or from Scientific American’s website The researchers disrupted the activity in this brain area using what’s called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). And they asked subjects to consider the morality of various acts. Some where the perpetrator had the intent to harm, others where they had no premeditation. When subjects had their brains affected by TMS, they focused less on the intention of the perpetrator and more on … Continue reading Podcast: Manipulating Moral Judgment

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The Critical Seconds

…Another fundamental skill that one can learn from NLP Practitioner training is how to re-program our own responses or neural-pathways to create change. The simplest way that you can do is remember a time that you might have lost your temper and reacted very strongly, only to regret what you said or did later. This is a bit like … Continue reading The Critical Seconds

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The Peeriodic Table of Illusions

The Peeriodic Table of Illusions from an article on http://www.newscientist.com 12 November 2009 by Richard L. Gregory, Magazine issue 2733. © Copyright Reed Business Information Ltd. Excerpt…. FOR all the fun we have with them, illusions do serious work in illuminating how our brains work, and in particular how perception works. They may also help us understand how consciousness developed, and tell us about our “neuro-archaeology” and the behaviour patterns laid down in the nervous system over evolutionary time. But let’s concentrate on perception: it is tricky enough. I’ve tried to classify illusions in a way that shows the principles … Continue reading The Peeriodic Table of Illusions

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Loneliness is infectious – Is this the work of those Mirror Neurons again?

Loneliness is infectious according to a study cited in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology for Dec/09. http://www.apa.org/journals/psp Is this the work of those Mirror Neurons again? “Before losing their friends, lonely people transmit feelings of loneliness to their remaining friends, who also become lonely. Because loneliness is associated with mental and physical diseases that can shorten life, Cacioppo said it is important for people to recognize loneliness and help those affected before they move away to the edges.” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology for Dec/09. http://www.apa.org/journals/psp/ Any wonder our mothers told us to stay away from people … Continue reading Loneliness is infectious – Is this the work of those Mirror Neurons again?

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