Mind

ABC All in the Mind feed

  • Emotional CPR
    Psychiatrist Daniel Fisher would like to shift the paradigm of mental health services and empower people to play a strong role in their own recovery—so he’s teaching emotional CPR.
  • Therapy outside the box
    New research on anxiety and depression is looking at the underlying emotional processes which trigger mental distress, and this is leading to a transdiagnosic approach to treatment.
  • The gambling zone
    People who spend a lot of time at the pokies could be familiar with ‘the zone’—a state of mind enhanced by the gambling environment to keep them at the machines.
  • The psychology of hoarding
    We all have different approaches to how much stuff we accumulate. But what happens when your attachment to things becomes so strong that a decision to let go of anything is impossible?
  • The divided brain
    Your brain is divided into distinct hemispheres which work together to give you different experiences of the world. But has the balance between the two halves of your brain got out of whack—and what’s the impact?
  • All in the Mind presents Science Friction
    If you enjoy All in the Mind you may be interested in this Science Friction episode on the psychological impact of working on the U.S. drone program.
  • Contemplating consciousness
    We contemplate the nature of consciousness with a philosopher, a neuroscientist, and a Buddhist scholar.
  • Racial bias and the brain
    Racism can be blatant and violent but often it's subtle and insidious. We explore the psychology and neuroscience of racial bias.
  • The enigma of time
    When we’re bored time drags, and wouldn’t you swear that time seems to speed up as you get older? Drawing on the latest insights from psychology and neuroscience we explore the mystery of time perception, it’s connection to our sense of self and how we could be the architect of our own perception of time.

ABC All in the Mind Poscasts

  • Emotional CPR
    Psychiatrist Daniel Fisher would like to shift the paradigm of mental health services and empower people to play a strong role in their own recovery—so he’s teaching emotional CPR.
  • Therapy outside the box
    New research on anxiety and depression is looking at the underlying emotional processes which trigger mental distress, and this is leading to a transdiagnosic approach to treatment.
  • The gambling zone
    People who spend a lot of time at the pokies could be familiar with ‘the zone’—a state of mind enhanced by the gambling environment to keep them at the machines.
  • The psychology of hoarding
    We all have different approaches to how much stuff we accumulate. But what happens when your attachment to things becomes so strong that a decision to let go of anything is impossible?
  • The divided brain
    Your brain is divided into distinct hemispheres which work together to give you different experiences of the world. But has the balance between the two halves of your brain got out of whack—and what’s the impact?
  • All in the Mind presents Science Friction
    If you enjoy All in the Mind you may be interested in this Science Friction episode on the psychological impact of working on the U.S. drone program.
  • Contemplating consciousness
    We contemplate the nature of consciousness with a philosopher, a neuroscientist, and a Buddhist scholar.
  • Racial bias and the brain
    Racism can be blatant and violent but often it's subtle and insidious. We explore the psychology and neuroscience of racial bias.
  • The enigma of time
    When we’re bored time drags, and wouldn’t you swear that time seems to speed up as you get older? Drawing on the latest insights from psychology and neuroscience we explore the mystery of time perception, it’s connection to our sense of self and how we could be the architect of our own perception of time.
  • Young people surviving cancer
    When you are young the last thing you expect is to be diagnosed with cancer and have to face your own mortality. Psychologists are working on ways to support young adults through their diagnosis, treatment and life post treatment.
  • Off the hook
    How to renegotiate your relationship with your smart phone.
  • A meaningful life
    It may well be that the most significant factor to determine sustained happiness is a sense of purpose and meaning in your life.
  • Considering pain
    The context in which we sense pain can change the experience of it—but there are things to learn about how this happens.
  • First impressions—the face bias
    The science behind our judgement of faces for their trustworthiness, competency, and character.
  • A superhuman escape
    Maude Julien was imprisoned by her father in an isolated mansion in France and subjected her to endless horrifying endurance tests in a plan to create a superhuman.
  • The creation of emotions
    Are the emotions we experience the same as everyone else's? New research shows that emotions are not 'hard-wired', and are developed by our brains and our bodies as we go through life.
  • Contemplating happiness with Matthieu Ricard
    Scientific studies have shown that your brain can be trained to be more compassionate; and together with altruism, it can generate a positive outlook for everyone.
  • The genetics of depression
    Depression is the most disabling chronic condition worldwide and research is now underway to precisely identify the genes associated with it—the results may lead to dramatically improved and personalised treatment.
  • Connecting with baby
    Emerging theories of child development suggest that a babies have agency over their movements even in the womb, and that their actions help them to make sense of the world.
  • The science of hedonism
    Sex, drugs, and rock ‘n' roll. It’s a winning trifecta—no matter what the potential dangers are. Hear about the discovery of LSD, and the wide-ranging effects that music has on our brain.
  • The psychology of paedophilia
    The psychology of paedophilia. Are there differences in the brains of paedophiles or is attraction to children on a universal continuum, controlled only by socialisation?
  • End of life care
    At a specially designed palliative care unit at a leading Sydney hospital we hear from a patient about his needs and expectations for the final stages of his life—and the staff reflect on what they learn about their own priorities in life by caring for others.
  • When a healthy diet becomes an unhealthy obsession
    We’re bombarded by blogs and social media with rules for healthy eating: quit sugar, go gluten-free, cut out carbs, eat paleo. But taking the rules too far could lead to an unhealthy obsession with healthy eating.
  • The food-mood connection
    In the emerging field of nutritional psychiatry, the evidence is now building that particular foods could have a significant influence on our mental health—particularly depression.
  • Learning to learn
    Most of us love being able to look up just about anything on our smart phones and know the answer in an instant. But do you ever worry about what that’s doing to our brains and our capacity to retain knowledge?
  • In the therapy room
    We go behind the closed doors of the consulting room with renowned psychotherapist of 40 years—Susie Orbach.
  • The secret history of self-harm
    After self-harming as a teenager, a historian delves into the past for some important insights into how we can better manage and treat those who self-harm today.
  • The medical muso
    There’s nothing like a favourite piece of music to lift your spirits, and music is known to play a powerful role in the healing process. Musician Andrew Schulman now uses music as medicine in hospital intensive care units.
  • The brain makers
    We’re beginning to understand the most complex piece of highly organised matter in the universe: the human brain. In international collaborations, scientists are unravelling its mysteries by using brain-inspired approaches to computing
  • Turbulent minds collide
    Martin is a happily-married GP, until he’s suddenly hit with the lows, then the highs of bi-polar disorder. A fictional work by one of Australia’s leading psychiatrists gives an intimate insight into people living with mood disorders.
  • Children who hear voices
    Imagination is vital for children's development, but sometimes kids hear voices of characters who aren’t there—a new book helps kids understand what's behind these voices.
  • The strength of recognition
    Indigenous people in the heart of our country are adversely affected by the harsh racial divide, and their history of suffering and trauma. We hear from psychologists and indigenous leaders about a ground-breaking community psychoanalytic approach to Aboriginal mental health
  • Growing up digitally
    Today’s kids are well connected to smart devices and social media platforms. Growing up digitally offers exciting opportunities, but also has its challenges.
  • Definitely tone deaf?
    Are you a good singer, or are you only comfortable singing in the privacy of your shower? We explore a condition called congenital amusia—also known as tone deafness—and track a self-confessed bad singer trying to get back in tune.
  • Dissociation and coping with trauma
    The compelling account of a woman who lived with dissociative identity disorder—and how she eventually became integrated.
  • What's in a face? Prosopagnosia
    The faces of our friends and family are instantly recognisable to us—but about 1 in 50 of us say that looking at a face is like looking at a brick wall.
  • The gendered mind
    Do men and women have fundamentally different minds? We re-examine the science to see if testosterone really is king when it comes to our gender formation.
  • Parenting with a mental illness
    Being a parent can be very rewarding, but if you are managing your own mental health you may not be able to be the parent you’d like to be. It can be sad and confusing for kids too—and they often take on a caring role.
  • Brain override
    Now that we know about brain plasticity, many of us hope that we can improve the control we have over some of our brain states.
  • The science of mind over body
    Placebos, virtual reality gaming, Pavlov’s-dog-style conditioning, and just plain care are some of the proven ways that our minds can treat and heal our bodies. There’s a growing body of scientific evidence confirming what we may already suspect about how mental states can affect health—but what are the limits of mind-body medicine?
  • The ghost in my brain
    When a professor of artificial intelligence had disturbing brain injury symptoms as a result of a concussion, he lost his former self—but encouraged by the potential of brain plasticity he changed the course of his life.
  • The mysterious corpus callosum
    The corpus callosum links one side of our brain to the other. It’s not essential for survival, but in some people it’s missing or malformed, causing quite mild to extreme disabilities. The good news is that research is now revealing that it holds intriguing secrets about brain plasticity.
  • It's a conspiracy
    9/11 was an inside job, Princess Diana was murdered in a government plot, and the Apollo 11 moon landing was faked. There’s a conspiracy theory for just about every major event—but believers aren’t just on the paranoid fringe, wearing tin foil hats.
  • The Indigenous memory code
    Traditional Aboriginal Australian songlines hold the key to a powerful memory technique used by indigenous people around the world.
  • Social lives, genes, and our health
    Having a sense of meaning in life can protect against chronic disease—but those who lack social connection are more prone to ill health. We talk with Steve Cole about social genomics.
  • Healing rhythms
    Rhythmic music can affect how the brain controls our stress response. We discuss with counsellor Simon Faulkner how group-based drumming taps into people’s emotions—and when combined with reflective discussion this can be an effective alternative form of therapy.
  • Emotional CPR
    Psychiatrist Daniel Fisher would like to shift the paradigm of mental health services and empower people to play a strong role in their own recovery—so he’s teaching emotional CPR.
  • The psychology of money
    As the festive season—and budgets—approach, we discuss how to wise-up to money. Lynne Malcolm and Claudia Hammond talk dollars and sense.
  • ADHD and overdiagnosis
    Twenty percent of American boys are diagnosed with ADHD by the time they turn 18—is ADHD being overdiagnosed and overtreated? Alan Schwarz, Florence Levy, and Rae Thomas give their perspectives.
  • Finding consciousness
    To help determine consciousness, a neuroscientist tells jokes to a person in a vegetative state, and scans their brain—Professor Adrian Owen describes his research.

Scientific American Mind

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Oxford Journals Mind from Oxford University Press

  • When Does Evidence Suffice for Conviction?
    AbstractThere is something puzzling about statistical evidence. One place this manifests is in the law, where courts are reluctant to base affirmative verdicts on evidence that is purely statistical, in spite of the fact that it is perfectly capable of meeting the standards of proof enshrined in legal doctrine. After surveying some proposed explanations for this, I shall outline a new approach – one that makes use of a notion of normalcy that is distinct from the idea of statistical frequency. The puzzle is not, however, merely a legal one. Our unwillingness to base beliefs on statistical evidence is by no means limited to the courtroom, and is at odds with almost every general principle that epistemologists have proposed as to how we ought to manage our beliefs.
  • Ockham’s Razors: A User’s Manual , by Elliott Sober.
    Ockham’s Razors: A User’s Manual, by SoberElliott. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. Pp. x + 314.

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